24

July

Everything you need to know about the Packers shareholders meeting in 200 words

Packers shareholders meeting

About 15,000 people attended Thursday’s Packers shareholders meeting and another 10,000 watched online.

The Packers held their annual shareholders meeting on Thursday at Lambeau Field. Here’s everything you need to know in 200 words or less.

  • Packers president Mark Murphy reported that 350,000 stockholders hold more than 5 million shares of Packers stock.
  • The Packers were ninth in total revenues last season at $324.1 million.
  • Ted Thompson put everyone to sleep with his remarks and ended with “Go Pack Go.”
  • The Packers have 112,000 people on their season ticket waiting list.
  • Lambeau Field now holds 80,750 people, second most in the NFL.
  • The playoff ticket policy is changing. Playoff tickets will only be paid for if the game is played. No more holding money to deposit toward next year’s season tickets.
  • Murphy said they’re working on improving in-stadium wi-fi.
  • The Packers are buying up all kinds of property around Lambeau Field and hoping to attract businesses and other development to a “Titletown District.”
  • The average ticket price for a Packers game ranks 17th in the league. Team may move to variable pricing for preseason games next year.
  • It doesn’t sound like the NFL will bring the draft to Green Bay any time soon.
  • The Packers have $272 million in corporate reserves (this team is loaded on the field and at the bank).
  • Murphy said the Cowboys call themselves “America’s team.” The Packers are the “World’s team.”

That about sums it up as succinctly as possible. Players report to training camp on Friday. Who’s ready for some football?

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Adam Czech is a freelance reporter and a Packers fan living in the Twin Cities. Follow Adam on Twitter. Read more of Adam's writing on the Packers here.

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13

July

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Brett Favre will not get his number retired by the Packers next season.

That in and of itself is not the story.

The story is why.

The Packers and Favre fear a negative reception from the fans.

“That is an issue,” Murphy said, via ESPN Wisconsin’s Jason Wilde. “He doesn’t want it, and neither do we. He wouldn’t want to come back and get booed. You can’t control 80,750 people. I really think as time goes on, every year that passes, it’s less likely that he would get booed, but that is an issue.”

Exactly Ted. You cannot control over 80,000 fans. So why would waiting until 2015 or 2016 change anything?

What we’ve learned about Favre is that he moves the needle in Wisconsin and among Packers fans. And since 2008, allegiances have shifted. Many will cheer him when he comes back to see his number on the Lambeau Field facade.

However, many will boo. And I know that no matter how long Ted Thompson is willing to wait, those folks will boo because Favre decided to wear the hated purple of the Minnesota Vikings.

Just get it done already. He is getting his bronze bust in the summer of 2016 and the Packers have to retire No. 4 before then. Waiting on the correct time is admirable, but it’s not going to sway anyone at this point.

 

Packers News, Notes and Links

Non Packers links and other Nonsense

  • I never knew there was such a thing as a sex allergy.
  • If you’re ever in Kodiak, Alaska and in need of a haircut, you’re going to pay for it.
  • Harrison Ford turns 72 today. The man that played Han Solo and Indiana Jones attended Ripon College.
1

July

Cory’s Corner: Bucks prove that the Packers are first-rate

The Packers have an .800 winning percentage in Super Bowls, but what sets the organization apart is how up-front and honest it is.

The Packers have an .800 winning percentage in Super Bowls, but what sets the organization apart is how up-front and honest it is.

The Packers should never have a goal to be compared to the Bucks.

On Monday it was proven why.

The Milwaukee Bucks went behind its general manager’s (and head coach’s) back by bringing aboard the highly questionable Jason Kidd to coach his second season of pro ball.

That would never happen in Green Bay.

The entire fan base is split on the jobs that Ted Thompson and Mike McCarthy do, but what cannot be argued is that it truly is a first-class organization.

Is part of that because there isn’t an owner that’s meddling into player or coaching decisions? Perhaps.

But, even when the Packers were losing at an alarming rate in the 1970s and 1980s, a period that saw only four seasons over .500, the constant was how professional the team was.

Of course, the Packers had their fair share of coaching changes. They had five in that dry period alone. But at least the Packers had the decency to fire the coach first and then let the general manager begin the arduous task of trying to find the right fit.

And that’s why the Packers are one of the most respected NFL clubs along with the Steelers, 49ers and Giants. Green Bay knows it is fighting a losing battle against much larger cities — and many that boast warmer weather. But the one constant is how up front and transparent the Packers are.

I don’t expect the Packers to go and videotape an opponent’s practice anytime soon and I highly doubt that Lambeau will be able to generate anything close to the gobs of money that Jerry Jones makes at his AT&T Stadium.

The Packers have one of the richest traditions in all of sports and they play in a cathedral that serves as a Mecca for even non-Packers fans.

I guess it pays to do things the right way.

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Cory Jennerjohn is from Wisconsin and has been in sports media for over 10 years. To contact Cory e-mail him at jeobs -at- yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter: Cory Jennerjohn

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28

June

Cory’s Corner: Colt Lyerla worth the risk for the Packers

We’ve officially reached the dead point of the Packers’ season.

Colt Lyerla was taken by the Packers as undrafted rookie. He runs the 40-yard dash in 4.6 seconds.

Colt Lyerla was taken by the Packers as an undrafted rookie. He ran the 40-yard dash in 4.6 seconds in addition to a 39-inch vertical.

You won’t see oversized guys moving in fridges and TVs into St. Norbert College dorms until July 25, so this is when things start to slow down a bit.

But until that day approaches, one of the most important positions heading into next season is tight end. And with Jermichael Finley’s status still uncertain, despite his nameplate still being attached in the locker room, the that job looks to be wide open.

And the more I examine it, why can’t Oregon standout Colt Lyerla be the next sure-handed tight end target for the next generation? He’s got impressive raw ability, has a knack to get open, maintains soft hands which is helpful for tough grabs in traffic and at 6-foot-4, 247 pounds, he has the frame that will keep on the field on running and passing downs.

Everyone knows that Lyerla left his Oregon teammates early last season and also pled guilty to cocaine. But during his two-and-a-half years in Eugene, he played for two head coaches, which isn’t exactly easy for any kid, let alone one that saw his parents divorce at age 9.

The Packers can give something that Lyerla has never had before or has never taken advantage of before: A proven, successful structure and an ear to listen. More than anything, Lyerla needs to be placed into a routine that works to give him confidence, which will earn him trust with Aaron Rodgers. And also he’s going to need to be able to find players on the team that will allow him to explain where he’s coming from, which will allow Lyerla to trust his teammates.

Lyerla has shown off his athleticism to the Packers this spring with amazing leaping catches that have even wowed some members of the defense. He’s got the ability. There’s no doubt about that, which is why he made The Play of the Week on SportsCenter in high school.

Amazingly enough, Lyerla is a lot like Finley when the Packers drafted him as a 21-year-old in 2008. Finley had plenty of physical attributes and filled up a scout’s notebook with superlatives, but he also publicly criticized one of the best Packers passers of all-time and didn’t accept his role on an offense that had lots of firepower.

26

June

Stinky Cheese: The Broken Bond Between the Packers and Fans

Something smells funny in Packer Nation.

Something smells funny in Packer Nation.

The relationship between the Green Bay Packers and their fans has been one of the most special in all of professional sports.

Instead of one deep-pocketed owner running the show, the Packers are literally owned by the fans. Each owner has stock in the team that gives them voting rights at the team’s annual shareholder meeting each summer at Lambeau Field.

The team has over 360,000 shareholders that can call tthemselves NFL owners.  Of course that many people can’t oversee the Packers’ day-to-day operations so that’s where the president and CEO, currently Mark Murphy, comes into play.

You would think that such a unique ownership structure would create the strongest bond between a team and its fans in the history of the NFL.

In the past it certainly has, but in this modern age of the NFL, the relationship between the Packers and their fans is not as harmonious as it has been even going back just one decade ago.

In fact, you could argue the Packers and their fans have a broken relationship and not everything is well in Packerland.  The team and its fans could even use some “couples therapy.”

It’s time to face the truth: the Packers don’t care about their fans as much as they used to.  The same, to be fair, could be said about the other 31 NFL franchises, but this realization will sting particularly hard for Packers fans given the ownership structure of the team.

The NFL is a money making machine.  Profit is what makes the league go round and after the lockout in 2011, the league knows fans will watch no matter what they do or change. They’re shaking their moneymaker for all it’s worth.

The same could be said for the Packers. The team’s decision making process is no longer driven by the well being of the fans but rather that of the almighty dollar.

Some of the decisions have been truly mind boggling as well.  Look at the sudden decision of the Packers to do away with Fan Fest, a multiple day gathering at the Lambeau Atrium for fans to mingle with players both past and present as well as other activities.

The team cited declining attendance as one reason for it’s demise (the 2011 event was canceled due to the lockout) but at $85 a ticket, there was a reason many people stopped showing up.

14

June

Cory’s Corner: The sooner the better in honoring Brett Favre

Time does heal all wounds.

In a recent interview with SiriusXM NFL Radio, Brett Favre wasn’t short about his former employer and he didn’t make any demands about the future.

Brett Favre has proven time can heal wounds. The Packers need to speed up the process to honor one of the all-time greats.

Brett Favre has proven time can heal wounds. The Packers need to speed up the process to honor one of the all-time greats.

He was refreshingly honest.

‘Time heals a lot of things, and I think in this case, you’re playing for the rival team, things are going to change,” Favre said. “There’s no better history than there is in Green Bay – the tradition, and people love their team there, and they usually hate the other team. So when you join their opponent, that’s going to happen.”

It seems like the time spent pumping iron has cleared Favre’s mind.

Remember when Favre “retired” in the spring of 2008, things became a little sticky with him and Ted Thompson after Favre asked for an unconditional release so he could play for another team. He also was a guest on the Fox News Channel show “On The Record with Greta Van Susteren,” where he said the Packers were dishonest with him.

Obviously, no matter how you feel about Favre, he deserves to be honored by the Packers. He is the only player to win the AP MVP award three straight times and he owns eight major passing records including career passing touchdowns (508) and career passing yards (71,838).

It’s also interesting that Favre was asked about Aaron Rodgers. It has been widely reported that Favre wasn’t ready to write a how-to book on mentoring when the Packers drafted Rodgers in 2005.

“I’m no idiot, I know that there’s always someone who’s going to replace you,” said Favre. “The fact he was drafted in the first round, it was time for him to give it a shot. When I did retire, he became that guy. I understand that. I have no ill feelings or animosity towards Aaron. In fact, I thought we got along well. We watched tons of film together to help him along the way.”

If they got along so well, why didn’t Favre speak up when Rodgers’ car was getting keyed in the player’s lot? Why didn’t Favre say anything about the alarming boos that Rodgers received when he set foot on the practice field in 2008?

29

May

Packers Fans: Give Colt Lyerla a Chance

NFL, Green Bay Packers, Colt Lyerla, Mike McCarthy, Ted Thompson,  Packers 2014 draft, Packers undrafted free agents

Will Colt Lyeral live up to his potential in Green Bay?

Fighting your own demons is tough enough as it is, but when you’re a member of either a Division I college football team or an NFL franchise, that task can seem downright impossible.

That is the quest that stands before Green Bay Packers rookie tight end Colt Lyerla.

If you aren’t already aware, Lyerla has quite the backstory.  He came from a broken home and moved from house to house as a child. It became clear in high school he was a freak athlete and signed on at the University of Oregon where he was once touted as a potential first round NFL draft pick.

Unfortunately for Lyerla, he never could quite stay out of trouble.  He was suspended during the 2013 season from Oregon and later quit the team, a move Lyerla later said he regretted. Lyerla soon after was arrested for cocaine possession.   He also in the past tweeted about the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary being a government conspiracy.

Thanks to these incidents, Lyerla went undrafted in this spring’s NFL Draft. In the modern NFL, talent on the field is useless if you can’t stay out of trouble off of it.

After the draft, the Packers offered Lyerla a tryout and soon after he was signed to a contract.  For all their talk about “Packer People,” general manager Ted Thompson and head coach Mike McCarthy seemingly rolled the dice with Lyerla.

Had the Packers sold their soul in order to win or are they simply trying to give a talented but troubled player a shot at redemption in a structured organization with a strong and tight-knit locker room?

The money should be on the latter. The fact that the Packers brought back Johnny Jolly last year and previously signed a troubled Koren Robinson says the Packers believe they have what it takes to help troubled players and turn them into not just good players but upstanding citizen as well.

All of us make mistakes. Even this writer a few weeks ago had Colin Kaepernick nailed to the wall because he allegedly smoked some pot in Miami. I took to Twitter and proceeded to make a total fool of myself. I have since apologized and acknowledged I was dead wrong in that situation. I was uneducated on the matter and leapt foolishly to a conclusion.  It was my fault.