17

July

Packers Video: Green Bay Packers 101

Every Green Bay Packers fan has faced this question at one point or another:

“Why the Packers?”

The fan then gives their reason for their apparent insanity.  It could be the team’s tradition or it could be a family tradition or a Wisconsin birthright for those born in the Dairy State.  Each fan has their own unique story as to how and why they became and still remain a Packers fan.

In rare circumstances, you may find yourself at a loss for words (because the Packers are so darn awesome) or you might have difficulty explaining your fandom to someone who prefers a much more visual medium.

If that’s the case here is WatchMojo.com’s Greatest Sports Franchises series on THE greatest sports franchise, the Green Bay Packers.  It serves as a great “Packers 101″ for anyone who knows little to nothing about the team’s history.

Those poor uneducated souls.

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Kris Burke is a sports writer covering the Green Bay Packers for AllGreenBayPackers.com and WTMJ in Milwaukee. He is a member of the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA) and his work has been linked to by sites such as National Football Post and CBSSports.com. Follow @KrisLBurke

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2

June

Green Bay Packers Video: Oneida Nation Walk of Legends

This video shows all of the monuments that comprise the  mile-long walking tour known as the Green Bay Packers “Walk of Legends. A full description of each stop and their location can be found below the video.

On your next trip to Green Bay, be sure to visit the Walk of Legends:

Thirteen monuments are dedicated to Packers Players or coaches:

Vince Lombardi, at Brown County Veterans Arena/Former Packers Hall of Fame Building, 1901 S. Oneida St.

Bart Starr, at Brown County Veterans Arena/Former Packers Hall of Fame Building, 1901 S. Oneida St.

Jerry Kramer, WLUK/Fox 11 Studios, 787 Lombardi Ave.

Don Hutson, Saranac Glove Co., 999 Lombardi Ave.

Fuzzy Thurston, Hudson-Sharp Machine Co., 975 Lombardi Ave.

Max McGee, Hudson-Sharp Machine Co., 975 Lombardi Ave.

Reggie White, corner of Reggie White Way and Lombardi Avenue

Jim Taylor, near corner of Bart Starr Drive and Tony Canadeo Run

Johnny Blood McNally, near corner of Reggie White Way and Tony Canadeo Run

Paul Hornung, in front of Champions Sports Bar & Grill ,1007 Tony Canadeo Run

Ray Nitschke, in front of the Cambria Suites, 1011 Tony Canadeo Run

Tony Canadeo, on Tony Canadeo Run, behind Brett Favre’s Steakhouse, 1004 Brett Favre Pass

Brett Favre, Brett Favre’s Steakhouse, 1004 Brett Favre Pass

Eleven monuments reference specific eras in Packers’ history, along with a one-word theme meant to capture the spirit of that era:

Pride (1895-1918), at Brown County Veterans Arena/Former Packers Hall of Fame Building, 1901 S. Oneida St.

Drive (1919-28), outside Hilton Garden Inn, 1015 Lombardi Ave.

Power (1929-33), outside Hilton Garden Inn, 1015 Lombardi Ave.

Talent (1934-38), will be installed in September at Saranac Glove Co., 999 Lombardi Ave.

Valor (1939-48), Prestige Office Center, 935 Lombardi Ave.

Vision (1949-58), Prestige Office Center, 935 Lombardi Ave.

Glory (1959-68), outside Marty’s Boston Crab, 875 Lombardi Ave.

Honor (1969-78), outside Marty’s Boston Crab, 875 Lombardi Ave.

Faith (1979-88), near the Lombardi Avenue entrance to the Tundra Lodge Resort and Waterpark, 865 Lombardi Ave.

Esteem (1989-1998), on the west side of Pizza Hut, 859 Lombardi Ave.

Spirit (1999-present), on the west side of Pizza Hut, 859 Lombardi Ave.

25

June

Meet Vince Lombardi… with An Accent

This story is about a gruff, quote-worthy coach who single-handidly built a football dynasty in the 1960s. No, this isn’t a review of the upcoming Broadway play based on the life of Vince Lombardi. Rather, it’s an interesting story about another type of football coach, born the same year as Vince, whose persona and achievements closely mirror those of Lombardi. Eerily so, in some cases. I call him “Vince Lombardi with an Accent”. This fine piece of historical comparison is brought to you by guest author Fran Dunn, a Packer fan from “across the pond”, known as “baboons” on twitter.

“Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.”

I wonder how many of you reading that quote thought you’d missed an excerpt from one of Vince Lombardi’s famous speeches.  Don’t worry, you haven’t.  These words belong to Bill Shankly, the manager of English football team Liverpool in the 1960s.  Shankly created a team, a dynasty that would live past his retirement and untimely death in 1981.

If Green Bay is TitleTown USA, then Liverpool is the English equivalent.  It remains English football’s most successful team, being national champions 18 times and European champions five times. Whilst many of these titles would come after he left the club, it was Shankly’s ideas, Shankly’s philosophy, Shankly’s “way” that was responsible for the success.  Shankly and Lombardi were men cut from the same cloth.

AL’s Note: Listen to Shankly’s words. This is Vince Lombardi with an Accent:

Bill Shankly was born just three months after Lombardi, in September 1913, far from the cauldron of Brooklyn in the Scottish mining village of Glenbuck.  One of ten children, his family lived a spartan life.  The one respite for the young Shankly was the cinema.  An eight mile round trip to the nearest picture house by foot would take him to the heartland of American cities and their mobster gangs.

His love of James Cagney and Edward G Robinson would follow him into his managerial career, often quoting movies at players he believed weren’t pulling their weight. “Foist is foist and second is nut’n,” he would say, pointing out that mobsters, not sportsmen were the true “hard men” – if they made a mistake, they were shot dead.  Even his speech, soaked in a broad Ayrshire accent that would never be diluted despite years in England, mirrored Cagney’s machine gun delivery.

29

May

Green Bay Packers History: Video 3-Pack