17

July

Packers Video: Green Bay Packers 101

Every Green Bay Packers fan has faced this question at one point or another:

“Why the Packers?”

The fan then gives their reason for their apparent insanity.  It could be the team’s tradition or it could be a family tradition or a Wisconsin birthright for those born in the Dairy State.  Each fan has their own unique story as to how and why they became and still remain a Packers fan.

In rare circumstances, you may find yourself at a loss for words (because the Packers are so darn awesome) or you might have difficulty explaining your fandom to someone who prefers a much more visual medium.

If that’s the case here is WatchMojo.com’s Greatest Sports Franchises series on THE greatest sports franchise, the Green Bay Packers.  It serves as a great “Packers 101″ for anyone who knows little to nothing about the team’s history.

Those poor uneducated souls.

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Kris Burke is a sports writer covering the Green Bay Packers for AllGreenBayPackers.com and WTMJ in Milwaukee. He is a member of the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA) and his work has been linked to by sites such as National Football Post and CBSSports.com. Follow @KrisLBurke

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---- Get AddToAny
13

July

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Brett Favre will not get his number retired by the Packers next season.

That in and of itself is not the story.

The story is why.

The Packers and Favre fear a negative reception from the fans.

“That is an issue,” Murphy said, via ESPN Wisconsin’s Jason Wilde. “He doesn’t want it, and neither do we. He wouldn’t want to come back and get booed. You can’t control 80,750 people. I really think as time goes on, every year that passes, it’s less likely that he would get booed, but that is an issue.”

Exactly Ted. You cannot control over 80,000 fans. So why would waiting until 2015 or 2016 change anything?

What we’ve learned about Favre is that he moves the needle in Wisconsin and among Packers fans. And since 2008, allegiances have shifted. Many will cheer him when he comes back to see his number on the Lambeau Field facade.

However, many will boo. And I know that no matter how long Ted Thompson is willing to wait, those folks will boo because Favre decided to wear the hated purple of the Minnesota Vikings.

Just get it done already. He is getting his bronze bust in the summer of 2016 and the Packers have to retire No. 4 before then. Waiting on the correct time is admirable, but it’s not going to sway anyone at this point.

 

Packers News, Notes and Links

Non Packers links and other Nonsense

  • I never knew there was such a thing as a sex allergy.
  • If you’re ever in Kodiak, Alaska and in need of a haircut, you’re going to pay for it.
  • Harrison Ford turns 72 today. The man that played Han Solo and Indiana Jones attended Ripon College.
11

July

Packers, Favre Stall Number Retirement

Brett Favre

Favre frowns on the idea of returning to retire his number amidst boos from fans

Earlier this week, Green Bay Packers president and CEO Mark Murphy spoke to the media about the upcoming season and the talks that have been swirling about when the team might hold a retirement ceremony for former quarterback Brett Favre’s famous #4.

Just a few months ago, Murphy and Favre both admitted that there had been some dialogue between both sides and that a return to Green Bay was eventually in order.

It was sounding like it was all but a foregone conclusion that Favre would be back at some point during this next season for a ceremony of some sort.  The obvious thought was that it would be at one of the home games.

Murphy emphasized the team’s desire to get something done before Favre is eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2016.  That means time is running out.

Speculation began about which game was best for the team and Favre to reunite.  That both of Favre’s former teams, the New York Jets and Minnesota Vikings, were scheduled to appear in Green Bay this year only added to the intrigue.  The Packers wouldn’t possibly bring Favre in with the Vikings in town, would they?

Well, not to worry about the possibility of choosing the wrong game or time this season.  Murphy has backed off of his earlier statements about retiring Favre’s #4 so soon and has seemed to place more emphasis on having further dialogue and simply having Favre attend a game.  He now says that a ceremony during the 2014 season is unlikely.

Fox Sports Wisconsin’s Paul Imig ran a recap of some of Murphy’s comments this week.  Murphy says that neither Favre nor the team want a scenario in which he returns and fans are booing him.  Murphy makes it sound like a mutual concern and cited the fact that they can’t control 80,000 people.

If that’s what he’s selling, I’m not buying.  Kudos to Murphy and the Packers if they’re trying to add some mutuality to this sentiment, but this seems like another attempt by Favre to have more control of a situation than he is entitled to and it has stalled the process.

29

June

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers football

In a chat with ESPN’s Rob Demovsky this week, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers talked about getting together with Brett Favre and Bart Starr to talk football at some type of event.

Since we’re always one step ahead of ESPN here at ALLGBP.com, we’ve learned that Rodgers, Favre and Starr actually did get together last week. However, it wasn’t to talk about any old event, it was to plan Favre’s return to Lambeau Field at halftime of the Nov. 9 game against the Bears.

The trio met at Chico’s near tiny Ringle, Wisconsin. Chico’s is a bar/restaurant in the middle of a corn field that serves amazing chimichangas.

ALLGBP.com has obtained an exclusive transcript of this historical meeting. Here it is:

Starr and Favre arrive at the same time, Starr in his 1996 Buick and Favre on his riding lawn mower. They shake hands, walk across the gravel parking lot, enter Chico’s, and find a quiet table near the bar.

Starr: I almost didn’t recognize you with that giant beard and those two guns you’re carrying around.

Starr grips Favre’s biceps, which are exposed because Favre can’t find any shirts with sleeves in Mississippi that fit over his arms.

Favre: Thanks, Bart. I’m coming back to Lambeau this year and I need to be in good shape so I can fight all the fans.

Starr: Oh Brett. C’mon. No fans are going to try and fight you. They’ll be glad to have you back.

Favre: It’s all part of my plan to not get booed.

Starr: Your plan?

Favre: I don’t want to get booed, Bart. I need to be loved. To ensure Packers fans won’t boo me, I’m going to challenge them all to a fight.

Starr: Oh fer chirssakes…..

Favre: Yeah, before I even make it out of the tunnel, I’m going to get on the mic, tell everyone in the stadium that their mother is a Vikings fan, and dare them all to come out to the 50 yard line and fight me to the death.

Starr: So you’re going to have a death match with 80,000 Packers fans at Lambeau Field?

Favre: Goddang right. And I’m going to go undefeated, 80,000 – 0. Have you seen these things?

Favre kisses his biceps and does a Hulk Hogan pose.

15

June

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers football

Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers said this week that the current group of Packers receivers could be the deepest he’s had.

Remember before the 2006 season when Brett Favre said that teat team was the most talented he’s been a part of and we all chuckled? We thought it was just Favre being Favre, talking out of his you know what and maybe even having a little fun with his buddies from the Super Bowl teams of the 1990s.

Well, after a year of seasoning, the Packers went to the NFC championship game. Favre saw something in that group a lot of us overlooked and that talent eventually emerged. We can debate whether Favre’s statement was accurate when it came out of his mouth, but it ended up being a lot more accurate than we thought it would be.

Now Rodgers is heaping praise on a receiving group that features two rookies, a guy coming off a broken leg, no proven tight end and Jarrett Boykin, who appeared dead in the water last season before doing a 180 and coming up big when the Packers needed him.

Is Rodgers going overboard with his proclamation of this group’s depth? Not necessarily.

Favre qualified his praise of the 2006 team by saying it was also the most unproven and inexperienced team he’s been a part of. Most people conveniently overlooked that part of the quote.

The key phrase in Rodgers’ recent praise for his receivers is “could be.”

If Rodgers would have continued talking on the subject, he would have continued by saying his receivers “could be” his deepest if:

  • Randall Cobb returns to his old self.
  • Jarrett Boykin takes another step.
  • Davante Adams is the real deal and fills James Jones’ shoes.
  • Jared Abbrederius proves he’s the fifth-round steal a lot of people think he was.
  • Jordy is Jordy.
  • A tight end emerges as a red-zone threat.
  • Someone we’ve never heard of plays well.

Rodgers probably didn’t feel the need to expand on the “could be” portion of his praise because he’s confident that if his collar bone stays in one piece, a lot of those “ifs” will disappear and “could be” will turn into reality.

Packers News, Notes and Links

14

June

Cory’s Corner: The sooner the better in honoring Brett Favre

Time does heal all wounds.

In a recent interview with SiriusXM NFL Radio, Brett Favre wasn’t short about his former employer and he didn’t make any demands about the future.

Brett Favre has proven time can heal wounds. The Packers need to speed up the process to honor one of the all-time greats.

Brett Favre has proven time can heal wounds. The Packers need to speed up the process to honor one of the all-time greats.

He was refreshingly honest.

‘Time heals a lot of things, and I think in this case, you’re playing for the rival team, things are going to change,” Favre said. “There’s no better history than there is in Green Bay – the tradition, and people love their team there, and they usually hate the other team. So when you join their opponent, that’s going to happen.”

It seems like the time spent pumping iron has cleared Favre’s mind.

Remember when Favre “retired” in the spring of 2008, things became a little sticky with him and Ted Thompson after Favre asked for an unconditional release so he could play for another team. He also was a guest on the Fox News Channel show “On The Record with Greta Van Susteren,” where he said the Packers were dishonest with him.

Obviously, no matter how you feel about Favre, he deserves to be honored by the Packers. He is the only player to win the AP MVP award three straight times and he owns eight major passing records including career passing touchdowns (508) and career passing yards (71,838).

It’s also interesting that Favre was asked about Aaron Rodgers. It has been widely reported that Favre wasn’t ready to write a how-to book on mentoring when the Packers drafted Rodgers in 2005.

“I’m no idiot, I know that there’s always someone who’s going to replace you,” said Favre. “The fact he was drafted in the first round, it was time for him to give it a shot. When I did retire, he became that guy. I understand that. I have no ill feelings or animosity towards Aaron. In fact, I thought we got along well. We watched tons of film together to help him along the way.”

If they got along so well, why didn’t Favre speak up when Rodgers’ car was getting keyed in the player’s lot? Why didn’t Favre say anything about the alarming boos that Rodgers received when he set foot on the practice field in 2008?

24

May

Cory’s Corner: Sterling Sharpe belongs in the Hall of Fame

Sterling Sharpe finished his seven-year NFL career with 595 receptions, 8,134 yards and 65 touchdowns.

Sterling Sharpe finished his seven-year NFL career with 595 receptions, 8,134 yards and 65 touchdowns.

Sterling Sharpe will be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame this year.

And he should be an NFL Hall of Famer as well.

That may be surprising to many, but Sharpe only played seven seasons and he made great use of his time by being named a Pro Bowler five times and an All-Pro three times.

Sharpe’s career was cut short due to a neck injury in which the top two vertebrae were damaged, forcing the superstar to retire.

In 1992, Sharpe led the NFL in receptions with 108. That’s 24 more catches that Jerry Rice and 30 more grabs than Michael Irvin. Both guys are in Canton.

The next year was more of the same. Sharpe tallied 112 receptions, which was four more than Rice, 24 more than Irvin, 26 more than Cris Carter and 31 more than his brother Shannon. All of those guys are in the Hall of Fame.

The best indication of what Sharpe did for his team was scoring. For his career, he scored 27 percent of the Packers’ touchdowns. Think about that for a second. He scored nearly 400 points — and that counts his rookie year in which he only scored one touchdown.

Sharpe is tied for 48th all-time in touchdown receptions. Guess who he’s tied with? None other than Michael Irvin. The Cowboys receiver played five more seasons than Sharpe, not to mention with much better offensive weapons. That should be the clincher for Sharpe right there.

But, of course people have a problem with the fact that Sharpe had a truncated career. Which is true. But with the numbers that Sharpe produced while catching passes from starting quarterbacks Don Majkowski, Randy Wright, Anthony Dilweg, Mike Tomczak and Brett Favre, it’s amazing Sharpe was able to put up those numbers at all.

With Favre chucking fastballs in 1992, Sharpe became one of seven receivers all-time to lead the league in receptions, yards and touchdowns.

Sharpe was playing ahead of his time. Now all the rage is the oversized, yet agile tight end. Sharpe was the oversized wide receiver that had blazing speed as well. His route-running was spot-on but what made him great was not that he had the presence to come back to the ball. But he knew exactly when to do it.