13

July

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Brett Favre will not get his number retired by the Packers next season.

That in and of itself is not the story.

The story is why.

The Packers and Favre fear a negative reception from the fans.

“That is an issue,” Murphy said, via ESPN Wisconsin’s Jason Wilde. “He doesn’t want it, and neither do we. He wouldn’t want to come back and get booed. You can’t control 80,750 people. I really think as time goes on, every year that passes, it’s less likely that he would get booed, but that is an issue.”

Exactly Ted. You cannot control over 80,000 fans. So why would waiting until 2015 or 2016 change anything?

What we’ve learned about Favre is that he moves the needle in Wisconsin and among Packers fans. And since 2008, allegiances have shifted. Many will cheer him when he comes back to see his number on the Lambeau Field facade.

However, many will boo. And I know that no matter how long Ted Thompson is willing to wait, those folks will boo because Favre decided to wear the hated purple of the Minnesota Vikings.

Just get it done already. He is getting his bronze bust in the summer of 2016 and the Packers have to retire No. 4 before then. Waiting on the correct time is admirable, but it’s not going to sway anyone at this point.

 

Packers News, Notes and Links

Non Packers links and other Nonsense

  • I never knew there was such a thing as a sex allergy.
  • If you’re ever in Kodiak, Alaska and in need of a haircut, you’re going to pay for it.
  • Harrison Ford turns 72 today. The man that played Han Solo and Indiana Jones attended Ripon College.
---- Get AddToAny
29

June

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers football

In a chat with ESPN’s Rob Demovsky this week, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers talked about getting together with Brett Favre and Bart Starr to talk football at some type of event.

Since we’re always one step ahead of ESPN here at ALLGBP.com, we’ve learned that Rodgers, Favre and Starr actually did get together last week. However, it wasn’t to talk about any old event, it was to plan Favre’s return to Lambeau Field at halftime of the Nov. 9 game against the Bears.

The trio met at Chico’s near tiny Ringle, Wisconsin. Chico’s is a bar/restaurant in the middle of a corn field that serves amazing chimichangas.

ALLGBP.com has obtained an exclusive transcript of this historical meeting. Here it is:

Starr and Favre arrive at the same time, Starr in his 1996 Buick and Favre on his riding lawn mower. They shake hands, walk across the gravel parking lot, enter Chico’s, and find a quiet table near the bar.

Starr: I almost didn’t recognize you with that giant beard and those two guns you’re carrying around.

Starr grips Favre’s biceps, which are exposed because Favre can’t find any shirts with sleeves in Mississippi that fit over his arms.

Favre: Thanks, Bart. I’m coming back to Lambeau this year and I need to be in good shape so I can fight all the fans.

Starr: Oh Brett. C’mon. No fans are going to try and fight you. They’ll be glad to have you back.

Favre: It’s all part of my plan to not get booed.

Starr: Your plan?

Favre: I don’t want to get booed, Bart. I need to be loved. To ensure Packers fans won’t boo me, I’m going to challenge them all to a fight.

Starr: Oh fer chirssakes…..

Favre: Yeah, before I even make it out of the tunnel, I’m going to get on the mic, tell everyone in the stadium that their mother is a Vikings fan, and dare them all to come out to the 50 yard line and fight me to the death.

Starr: So you’re going to have a death match with 80,000 Packers fans at Lambeau Field?

Favre: Goddang right. And I’m going to go undefeated, 80,000 – 0. Have you seen these things?

Favre kisses his biceps and does a Hulk Hogan pose.

5

October

Cory’s Corner: Lombardi still resonates with Packers fans

Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi won five championships in seven years and is the only coach to win three straight.

Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi won five championships in seven years and is the only coach to win three straight.

 

Vince Lombardi is an expected learn. Not just in snowy Packer country where Lombardi made the rest of the NFL scream “Uncle!” but throughout the globe where his level of success and achievement has been unreachable.

I was born nine years after he passed away in 1970, but the most amazing thing to me is how much that man means to a fan base that after all those years cannot stop talking about him, crawling on his imposing statue outside the Lambeau Field Atrium and cannot stop drooling at the NFL’s top prize, rightly named in his honor.

“To this day that is one thing that I’m surprised at,” said Lombardi’s grandson John, who was in New York on behalf of his grandfather to be a part of the “Hometown Hall of Famers” celebration recently.  “I thought over time that he would fade from memory. I mean he would’ve been 100 this year. His 100th birthday was in June. And to still be so relevant and referred to is amazing.”

The “Hometown Hall of Famers” is a program that started in 2011 and its sole mission is to highlight the hometown roots of the NFL’s best players with a special ceremony and a plaque that remains in the hometown. The Lombardi family chose to keep the plaque at St. Francis Preparatory School, where Lombardi honed his craft as an offensive lineman en route to earning a scholarship to Fordham University.

It didn’t take long for Lombardi to put the rest of the NFL in a stranglehold. Two years after the Packers finished 1-10-1 in 1958 and were within a whisper of losing the franchise, Lombardi churned out a playoff team for the first time since 1944. Lombardi didn’t stop there as he racked up three NFL championships and two Super Bowls in seven years, numbers that would make any opponent cripple to its knees.

“The greatest achievement is winning three championships in a row which in the playoff era no team has done,” said Lombardi who worked for 10 years in football with the World League, the Cleveland Browns, Vanderbilt University and Tennessee Oilers/Titans. “A lot have won two but no one has been able to win that third one. So it’s that achievement level that I think they’re all chasing. That accomplishment in and of itself is something that everyone can look to who’s in professional sports.

16

June

Surviving Sunday: Packers News, Notes and Links for the Football Deprived

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Surviving Sundays with no Packers Football

Profootballtalk.com asked fans to vote on their Packers Mt. Rushmore this week and it created some interesting debate on Twitter and talk radio.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the concept, the Packers Mt. Rushmore needs to consist of four people. It can be players, coaches, executives or whomever that you feel is one of the four most important people in Packers history.

This is a tough one. If there was an actual Packers Mt. Rushmore, it would need to go on the side of a very large mountain because four people is much too small.

As much as I love guys like Ron Wolf and Bob Harlan and acknowledge that the Packers might not be around without folks like them, I don’t know if I can put executives on a Mt. Rushmore. Isn’t putting executives on a Packers Mt. Rushmore kind of like putting Abe Lincoln’s chief of staff on the actual Mt. Rushmore instead of Abe Lincoln himself?

I’m also not sure coaches belong on a Mt. Rushmore. But that means leaving off Vince Lombardi and Curly Lambeau, which is just asinine.

If I knew that people wouldn’t burn down my house for leaving Lombardi and Lambeau off, I’d probably put Don Hutson, Bart Starr, Reggie White and Brett Favre on my Packers Mt. Rushmore. When the people arrived with torches and pitchforks to take care of me after leaving off Lombardi and Lambeau, I’d remove Hutson and White for the two legendary coaches.

Football will always be about the players to me. You absolutely have to have a good front office and coaching staff to make everything work, and I’ll say it again that the Packers are not the Packers without the executives and coaches I’ve already mentioned (along with many others).

But in the end, you have to wear a jersey and helmet instead of as suit and tie to make my Packers Mt. Rushmore.

Let us know who makes your Packers Mt. Rushmore in the comments section.

(And don’t yell at me too much for leaving Lombardi and Lambeau off my pre-torches and pitchforks Packers Mt. Rushmore.)

Packers News, Notes and Links

2

November

Woodson endorses Obama, Starr sides with Romney

President Obama (D) holds a Charles Woodson jersey along with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R)

President Obama (D) holds a Charles Woodson jersey along with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R)

It’s early November in an election year, and the Packers have a winning record through eight games. So with fan interest peaking and political ads flooding the media, it’s newsworthy when Charles Woodson and Bart Starr publicly endorse a certain presidential candidate.

On Thursday, Woodson endorsed Barack Obama at a rally in Green Bay. Many professional athletes try to avoid voicing their political leanings, but Woodson openly voiced his opinion on the election, citing the distribution of wealth as a key issue.

“You have a lot of people making a boatload of money who are complaining about money. They don’t have money problems,” Woodson said. “There’s a lot of people who do have money problems, and those are the people who should be complaining. Look at the East Coast right now. Those people need help.”

Woodson donated $100,000 to the American Red Cross to help in the relief effort following Hurricane Sandy. Be sure to check out Jason Wilde’s post on Woodson’s endorsement of Obama over at ESPNMilwaukee.com.

Starr, the 1966 NFL MVP and two-time Super Bowl Champion, sided with Romney during a rally Friday at State Fair Park.

“I just think when you look at how successful (Romney) has been everywhere he has been and what he has done, I’m very confident when elected president he will confirm and make those remarkable levels of success every-day achievements for us.”

Starr also attributed two of Vince Lombardi’s key traits–”integrity and excellence”–to Romney.

But the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel cited a statement from Graeme Zielinski, a spokesman for the state Democratic Party: “The Green Bay Packers have never won a Super Bowl with a Republican in the White House. Also, Vince Lombardi was a Democrat.”

So there you go–a major Packers figure stands on each side of the fence. Woodson, a current Packer and future Hall of Famer, stands with President Obama, while Starr, a Packer legend and Hall of Fame quarterback, sides with Romney.

Wisconsin, typically viewed as a “battleground state” around election time, seems to be leaning towards Obama according to recent polls.

Several polls have Obama currently leading; the latest poll from Marquette Law School suggests that Obama leads Romney 51 percent to 43 percent, while a poll by N-B-C News, the Wall Street Journal, and Marist College had Obama leading by three points. St. Norbert’s College in De Pere has Obama leading Romney 51 percent to 42 percent.

5

February

Super Memories in Video: The Top Five Moments in Green Bay Packers Super Bowl History

It’s not exactly the hair of the dog that bit you, but maybe a jog down memory lane will help us cure our “Super Bowl expectations that feel short” hangover that we have all been experiencing since the Green Bay Packers’ season ended three weeks ago.

There have been a lot of memorable moments in the five Super Bowls the Packers have played in, so narrowing the list to five moments was a daunting task.  This is by no means a definitive list, so you may have something else in mind. That’s fine. This was meant to be a fun post, not necessarily one for totally serious debate.

Keep in mind I am 28, so Super Bowls XXXI and XLV will be fresh in my head.  I have seen highlights of the first two Super Bowls but never viewed them in their entirety.

That said, here’s my top five:

5. Max McGee’s performance in Super Bowl I

Paul Hornung went down and McGee came in. Problem is McGee was hungover.

Thinking he wasn’t going to play much, McGee skipped curfew the night before the game and went out drinking. Personally, I would not have between so stupid with Lombardi around but it is what it is I guess.

McGee ended up catching 140 yards and likely would have been Super Bowl MVP had Bart Starr not had his great performance.

4. Vince Lombardi’s final ride

It’s an image engrained in every Packer fan’s head.

Vince Lombardi being carried off on the shoulders of Jerry Kramer after winning Super Bowl II, Lombardi’s final games as a Packer. It’s one of the great images in the storied franchise’s history.

It also signified an end of an era in Green Bay. The Packers would not win another title for 29 years and would endure mainly futility for the next 25 years until Ron Wolf and Mike Holmgren came along.

3. 59 razor: Brett Favre to Andre Rison

Leading up to Super Bowl XXXI in New Orleans, Favre caught a highlight reel of Joe Montana in Super Bowl XXIV. Montana at one point audibles to a play called “59 razor” and the 49ers scored.

On the second play of the drive in Super Bowl XXXI, Favre audibled to the same play and got the same result–Rison scored on a long pass play.