Category Archives: Offense

Articles about the Green Bay Packers Football team – Offense

23

July

Is Jarrett Boykin A Replacement Player?

Jarrett Boykin will be slotted into the coveted No. 3 wide receiver next season. He's ready because of one person.

Jarrett Boykin

Wide receivers are known as the “shiny hood ornament” of the NFL because largely their production is tied to their quarterbacks; even a wide receiver like Larry Fitzgerald or Andre Johnson have had abysmal seasons with ineffectual quarterbacks behind center.  Furthermore, great/good wide receivers have left for greener pastures in free agency only to be met with an icy reception; Greg Jennings became the latest ex-Packer to move to Minneapolis and needless to say his production suffered when it was Christian Ponder and Josh Freeman throwing him the ball as opposed to Aaron Rodgers.

On the flip side, it almost seems like you can throw just about anybody into a jersey and make them a productive wide receiver if they are being fed the ball by Aaron Rodgers, Peyton Manning, Drew Brees or Tom Brady; wide receivers without enormous physical talent Wes Welker, Pierre Garcon and again Jennings have all had great careers even if they don’t look like Calvin Johnson.  Of course, it’s not like a wide receiver is nothing without his quarterback, the question is how much.

The receiver I was most interested in was Jarrett Boykin; an unheralded, undrafted wide receiver out of Virigina Tech who initially signed on with the Jacksonville Jaguars only to be cut after a couple weeks.  After being picked up by the Packers, he was one of the surprise rookies to make the squad in 2012 with the likes of Jordy Nelson, Randall Cobb, James Jones Jermichael Finley, Donald Driver and Greg Jennings all on the roster.

I’ll be the first to say I didn’t notice his name on the transaction wire nor did I predict him to make the roster in 2012 (this was the year of the Torey Gurley vs. Diondre Borel debate) nor did I think he would he do much on the field, and needless to say I, along with just about everyone else was in for a pleasant surprise.  Now with two years under his belt, people are legitimately thinking of him as a viable #2/#3 receiver; he’s definitely not a #1 who can take the top off of a defense nor is he the shifty guy catches everything, but he’s a great role player who does everything good enough to contribute on a consistent basis.  Considering his rise from unknown prospect to perhaps one of the up and coming wide receivers, is this a product of good talent or a good quarterback?

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21

July

Packers Xs and Os: What We Might See From McCarthy’s Up-Tempo Offense (Part 1)

Will Aaron Rodgers be leading an up-tempo or no huddle offense in 2014? (Photo credit: Jeff Hanisch/USA Today).

Will Aaron Rodgers be leading an up-tempo or no huddle offense in 2014? (Photo credit: Jeff Hanisch/USA Today).

This off season, Green Bay Packers head coach Mike McCarthy mentioned two philosophical adjustments he would like to see his offense implement this year: 1) run a faster up-tempo game plan with 75 plays per game, and 2) have three-down players on the field to limit the number of substitutions, which will speed up the game tempo.

These are pretty lofty goals, but the Packers do have the offensive personnel to execute it, particularly because their top three running backs (Eddie Lacy, James Starks, and DuJuan Harris) are three-down backs. The biggest question mark will be if their starting tight end is up to the task of multiple formations and assignments.

In order to execute those two offensive objectives, it’s more than just snapping the ball with plenty of time left on the play clock; it’s an elaborate implementation of situation football.

As my standard disclaimer, I’ve never seen McCarthy’s playbook and none of us will know how he will go about carrying out these plans until the week one opening game against the Seattle Seahawks. But, I will speculate about some things I expect us to see while the Packers are in their up-tempo game.

When to Go Up-Tempo

The offense should only go up-tempo when the score is close or they are behind. If they are sitting on a large lead, it makes sense to slow down the plays to bleed the clock. But, there’s also down and distance rules, as well as clock management strategies, that should be considered.

  • 1st and 2nd downs at almost any distance to gain are acceptable for up-tempo and no huddle.
  • 3rd down and 7 yards or less are also acceptable for up-tempo and no huddle. Longer 3rd downs often necessitate a huddle to ensure the best play call and allow the offense to slow down and gain composure. That is, unless, the offense is in a two-minute drill.
  • Re-huddle after clock stoppages (penalties, out of bounds, incomplete passes, change of possession, instant replay review, etc).

Three-Down 11 Personnel 

25

June

What is fair value for Eddie Lacy?

Eddie Lacy Pro Bowl

How much would you pay this guy?

Packers fans have been quipping that the running back is the most fungible position in the NFL; I’ve said it, my colleagues here on the blog have said it and tons of you have said it in your comments (yes we do read your comments).  In truth, it’s an easy thing for Packers fans to say simply because the Packers aren’t the type of team that revolves around running the ball; with Mike McCarthy at the helm, Aaron Rodgers behind center and Ted Thompson on top of the front office, the Packer’s have been a pass-first, pass-second, run as an afterthought type of franchise.

On the flip side, ask any Minnesota Vikings fans what they think about the running game and I’m sure you’ll get a completely different response.  Outside of a miraculous 2009 season, there hasn’t been much for Vikings fans to hang their hat on; sure the defense has been occasionally good but their football identity is running the ball with Adrian Peterson.  However Peterson is a once in a generation type of player and the simple fact is that running backs are not very valuable in the NFL; they’re production has plateaued lower than their receiving counterparts, the massive toll playing the position takes on their body and future production and the shift from the workhorse back to the running back by committee approach means you don’t need to find a running back that can do it all.  As a result, less and less running backs are being drafted, especially in the first round.

Packer’s fans might just have to start rethinking about the value of the running back position as the Packers might have a real star on their roster with Eddie Lacy in green and gold.  While Lacy was a godsend for the Packers last year and was essentially the offense while Aaron Rodgers recovered from his broken clavicle, Lacy was paid a mere $405,000 for perhaps the best season a running back has had since Ahman Green in his heyday. Keep in mind this is after winning rookie of the year honors; when Charles Woodson won defensive player of the year honors in 2010, the Packers responded by giving him a huge increase in pay even though he still had plenty of years left on his contract.

23

June

The Anticipated Return of Tackle Bryan Bulaga

Right tackle Bryan Bulaga. Photo credit: Amy Anderson (Wikimedia Commons).

Right tackle Bryan Bulaga. Photo credit: Amy Anderson (Wikimedia Commons).

Green Bay Packers offensive tackle Bryan Bulaga last played a live down on November 4, 2012. Now, as we enter the 2014-15 season, his return is highly anticipated and immensely needed.

Bulaga’s career up to this point has been a bit of an enigma through a combination of unfortunate injuries, missed opportunities, and unfulfilled promises. When he’s on the field, he shows a lot of ability and tenacity. Keeping him on the field, however, has been a little bit of a problem over the last two seasons.

The Packers drafted Bulaga with their first-round selection in the 2010 draft with the idea that he’d be the left tackle successor to aging Chad Clifton. In a show of true professionalism, Clifton embraced the idea of mentoring his eventual replacement.

Perhaps as a sign of unexpected things to come, Bulaga was counted upon during his 2010 rookie season to solidify the right tackle position after Mark Tauscher suffered a season-ending shoulder injury. Bulaga played admirably, and the Packers went on to win Super Bowl XLV.

Entering the 2011 season, the defending champion Packers appeared set with the bookend tackle combination of Clifton on the left and Bulaga on the right. They even drafted left tackle Derrick Sherrod as another option to succeed Clifton.

However, Clifton was hampered by injuries all season. In a somewhat curious move, the Packers elected to keep Bulaga on the right and try youngster Marshall Newhouse on the left. Sherrod proved to not be a viable option.

That 2011 offensive line was a bit of a motley crew en route to allowing 41 sacks and generating a measly 3.9 yards per rushing attempt.

Things got worse for the Packers in 2012. They still had a pedestrian 3.9 yards per carry, but they yielded an astronomical 51 sacks of Aaron Rodgers.

To make matters worse, when the Packers needed their running game the most during the cold months, Bulaga’s season ended on November 4, 2012, when he suffered a hip injury against the Arizona Cardinals.

During the following off-season, head coach Mike McCarthy didn’t mince words. By announcing he was swapping the left and right sides of his offensive line, he was boldly proclaiming the Marshall Newhouse experiment at left tackle was over and Bryan Bulaga was finally going to get his shot at the money position of left tackle.

29

May

Packers Fans: Give Colt Lyerla a Chance

NFL, Green Bay Packers, Colt Lyerla, Mike McCarthy, Ted Thompson,  Packers 2014 draft, Packers undrafted free agents

Will Colt Lyeral live up to his potential in Green Bay?

Fighting your own demons is tough enough as it is, but when you’re a member of either a Division I college football team or an NFL franchise, that task can seem downright impossible.

That is the quest that stands before Green Bay Packers rookie tight end Colt Lyerla.

If you aren’t already aware, Lyerla has quite the backstory.  He came from a broken home and moved from house to house as a child. It became clear in high school he was a freak athlete and signed on at the University of Oregon where he was once touted as a potential first round NFL draft pick.

Unfortunately for Lyerla, he never could quite stay out of trouble.  He was suspended during the 2013 season from Oregon and later quit the team, a move Lyerla later said he regretted. Lyerla soon after was arrested for cocaine possession.   He also in the past tweeted about the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary being a government conspiracy.

Thanks to these incidents, Lyerla went undrafted in this spring’s NFL Draft. In the modern NFL, talent on the field is useless if you can’t stay out of trouble off of it.

After the draft, the Packers offered Lyerla a tryout and soon after he was signed to a contract.  For all their talk about “Packer People,” general manager Ted Thompson and head coach Mike McCarthy seemingly rolled the dice with Lyerla.

Had the Packers sold their soul in order to win or are they simply trying to give a talented but troubled player a shot at redemption in a structured organization with a strong and tight-knit locker room?

The money should be on the latter. The fact that the Packers brought back Johnny Jolly last year and previously signed a troubled Koren Robinson says the Packers believe they have what it takes to help troubled players and turn them into not just good players but upstanding citizen as well.

All of us make mistakes. Even this writer a few weeks ago had Colin Kaepernick nailed to the wall because he allegedly smoked some pot in Miami. I took to Twitter and proceeded to make a total fool of myself. I have since apologized and acknowledged I was dead wrong in that situation. I was uneducated on the matter and leapt foolishly to a conclusion.  It was my fault.

19

May

Packers Sign TE Colt Lyerla

Colt Lyerla

The Packers signed troubled tight end Colt Lyerla following last week’s rookie mini camp.

The Green Bay Packers continue to raise eyebrows as they signed troubled and undrafted tight end Colt Lyerla to a contract, following last week’s rookie mini camp.  The news broke on Monday and Packer Report’s Bill Huber was one of the first to announce the signing.

Lyerla was on almost all of our FUBAR lists just prior to the draft and not many expected him to be in Green Bay under any circumstances.  He’s not typically the type of player the Packers bring in but his stature and potential were apparently enough for Packers general manger Ted Thompson to take a flier on the 6’4″ prospect out of Oregon.

Lyerla has had his issues with attitude problems as well as an arrest for cocaine possession within the last year.  Lyerla left the Oregon football team after he and the team reportedly mutually agreed that he should last season.  According to Lyerla’s twitter account, he seems to understand the opportunity that has been presented to him and hopefully can get his football career back on track.

Lyerla will go into the Packers’ offseason ready to compete with incumbents Andrew Quarless, Brandon Bostick, Ryan Taylor, Jake Stonburner and rookie draftee Richard Rodgers.  Colt is the type of low risk-high reward scenario that Thompson likes.  Should the team need to part ways with him, nothing is lost.  If Lyerla surprises and can somehow crack the practice squad or team roster, this could prove to be another big gem find for Thompson.

 

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Jason Perone is an independent sports blogger writing about the Packers on "AllGreenBayPackers.com

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16

May

Packers Offer Try-Out to Colt Lyerla

Packers beat reporter Rob Demovsky just tweeted a pic of the Packers rookie orientation with one surprising name.  One of the more interesting topics that hasn’t seen much news coverage is where former Oregon tight end Colt Lyerla ended up and now we have an answer; namely Lyerla likely didn’t get single offer as a undrafted rookie free agent and now must fight for a spot as a try-out player with the Packers. He will wear #49o during the rookie orientation.

On the football field, there aren’t many tight ends that I enjoyed watching more before the draft; at 6’4″ and 242 lbs, Lyerla is perhaps even more physically gifted than Eric Ebron, the first tight end drafted with the 10th pick by the Lions who is often compared to Vernon Davis himself.  Lyerla tested through the roof at the combine, being among the leaders in the 40 yard dash, vertical jump and broad jump for tight ends.  Lyerla also offers an interesting blend athleticism with the speed to split safeties and outrun linebackers but also the strength to be an aggressive run blocker.  Lyerla also has versatility as a H-back/RB, logging in 7 rushing attempts for 63 yards and a touchdown against Arizona in 2013.  While Lyerla is definitely raw in regards to route running and technique as a receiver and blocker, the physical tools are definitely there in abundance to make a truly complete tight end.

Naturally, players with Lyerla’s physical attributes don’t usually fall out of the draft, let alone not get signed as a rookie free agent and unfortunately Lylera’s positives on the field are overshadowed by the negatives off the field.  First off, Lyerla left the Oregon in middle of the 2013 season for “personal reasons” and was later arrested for cocaine possession.  Furthermore, Lyerla had a very troubled childhood and is often described as prone to emotional outbursts and immaturity.  It should be mentioned that 6 out of 7 ALLGBP staff writers had Lyerla on their 2014 NFL DRAFT “FUBAR” Board (i.e. WOULD NOT DRAFT), however as a try out player who doesn’t even get a contract, this is still a very safe move for the Packers.